Rue Morgue Magazine Partners and Vincent Price Estate Partner with Limited Edition Collectible Bobble-head Figures By BOB PUTIGNANO

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Vincent Price Limited Edition Figure:

www.Rue-Morgue.com

 MVD Entertainment Group

www.VincentPriceFigure.com

For sixteen years Bob Putignano has been pivotal at WFDU http://wfdu.fm with his Sounds of Blue radio show: http://www.SoundsofBlue.com ; Previously a senior contributing editor at Blues Revue, Blueswax, and Goldmine magazines, and Music Editor for the Yonkers Tribune,  and Making A Scene.

For sixteen years Bob Putignano has been pivotal at WFDU http://wfdu.fm with his Sounds of Blue radio show: http://www.SoundsofBlue.com ; Previously a senior contributing editor at Blues Revue, Blueswax, and Goldmine magazines, and Music Editor for the Yonkers Tribune, and Making A Scene.

Rue Morgue Magazine has partnered with Vincent Price’s estate to release their premiere figure in the Rue Morgue RIPpers limited edition line of collectible bobble-heads. Vincent Leonard Price, Jr. (May 27, 1911 – October 25, 1993) was an American actor well known for his distinctive voice and performances in horror films. His career spanned other genres, including film noir, drama, mystery, thriller, religious, music and comedy. He performed on stage, television, radio, and appeared in over one-hundred films. He has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: one for motion pictures, and one for television. Price was also an avid art collector and consultant with a degree in art history; he also lectured and wrote books on the subject. He was also the founder of the Vincent Price Art Museum in California.

 

VincentPricePrice’s first venture into the horror genre was in the 1939 Boris Karloff film “Tower of London.” The following year he portrayed the title character in the film “The Invisible Man Returns,” a role he reprised in a vocal cameo at the end of the 1948 horror-comedy spoof “Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein.” Price played villainous roles in film noir thrillers like 1947’s “The Web” and “The Long Night,” and 1949’s “The Bribe” with Robert Taylor, Ava Gardner and Charles Laughton. Price’s debut starring role was as conman James Addison Reavis in the 1950 biopic “The Baron of Arizona.” Furthermore Price did a comedic turn as the tycoon Burnbridge Waters, co-starring with Ronald Colman in “Champagne for Caesar” which was one of his favorite film roles. From 1947-51 Price was active in radio portraying the Robin Hood-inspired crime-fighter; Simon Templar in “The Saint,” later made famous on TV with future James Bond actor Roger Moore. During the 1950s Price focused on horror flicks; 1953’s “House of Wax” the first 3-D film to land in the year’s top ten at the North American box office. His next roles were 1954’s “The Mad Magician,” ‘58’s “The Fly,” and “Return of the Fly” from ‘59.

The 1960s Price remained popular and busy for Price; successes with Roger Corman and American International 1960’s “House of Usher” earned over two- million dollars at the box office and led to the subsequent Edgar Allan Poe adaptations “The Pit and the Pendulum,” “Tales of Terror,” “The Comedy of Terrors,” and “The Raven.” In 1964 Price starred in “The Last Man on Earth.” He returned to comedy, notably “Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine” (1965) and its sequel “Dr. Goldfoot and the Girl Bombs” (1966). In 1968 he played the part of an eccentric artist in the musical “Darling of the Day.” Price often spoke of his pleasure at playing Egghead in the “Batman” television series. One of the co-stars, Yvonne Craig (Batgirl) said Price was her favorite villain in the series. During a “Batman” scene Price threw eggs at series stars Adam West and Burt Ward, when asked to stop, answered, “With full artillery? Not a chance!” causing an egg-fight to erupt. The 1960s also saw Price as a guest on the game show “Hollywood Squares,” becoming a semi-regular in the 1970s, including being one of the guest panelists on the 1980 finale, where he was known for using his famous voice answering questions in a playful yet menacing tone. Besides Batman, Price also made TV guest appearances in “Get Smart,” “F Troop,” “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” and “Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea.”

In ‘73 Price appeared as himself in “Mooch Goes to Hollywood” a film written by Jim Backus. Price recorded dramatic readings of Edgar Allan Poe’s short stories and poems, collected readings by Basil Rathbone. Around 1975 Price reduced his film work but increased his narrative and voice work on ads for Milton Bradley’s “Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture.” Price’s voiceover is also heard on Alice Cooper’s 1975 debut solo album, “Welcome to My Nightmare,” and he also appeared in the corresponding TV special “Alice Cooper: The Nightmare.” For a year in the early 1970s Price starred in a syndicated daily radio program, “Tales of the Unexplained,” and made guest appearances in a 1970 episode of “Here’s Lucy” showcasing his art expertise. In the 1972 episode of ABC’s “The Brady Bunch,” he played a deranged archaeologist, and in ‘76 Price recorded a 45rpm single covering Bobby “Boris” Pickett’s, “The Monster Mash,” without much success. In 1976 Price also appeared as the featured guest in an episode of “The Muppet Show.”

Price performed a sinister monologue on the 1982 title track of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” album. A longer version of his rap (without music,) along with some conversation can be heard on Jackson’s 2001 reissue, and on ‘08’s “Thriller 25.” albums. In 1983 Price appeared in the film “House of the Long Shadows” with Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, and John Carradine. One of his last major roles, (and one of his favorites,) was as the voice of Professor Ratigan in ’86 “The Great Mouse Detective.” From 1981-89, Price hosted a TV series “Mystery!” In 1985 he provided voice to the Hanna-Barbera series “The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo” as the mysterious Vincent Van Ghoul. A lifelong rollercoaster fan; Price narrated a 1987 thirty-minute documentary on the history of rollercoasters. From 1985–89 he appeared in horror-themed commercials for “Tilex.” Price appeared in Shelley Duvall’s ‘84 action series “Faerie Tale Theatre” as the Mirror in “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” and the narrator for “The Boy Who Left Home to Find Out About the Shivers.” In ‘87, he starred with Bette Davis and Ann Sothern in “The Whales of August,” and was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame in ‘89. His last significant film work was as the inventor in Tim Burton’s 1990 “Edward Scissorhands.”

A witty raconteur Price was a frequent guest on “The Tonight Show” with Johnny Carson, once demonstrating how to poach a fish in a dishwasher. As a gourmet he authored several cookbooks; notably “A Treasury of Great Recipes,” and hosted a TV show “Cooking Pricewise.”

Looking back: Vincent Price’s seven-decade career was not only memorable; he was multifaceted, regularly reinventing himself into numerous (not always typecast roles) and kept busy to his final days. That being said; wouldn’t this 7-inch-tall figurine make for a mysterious centerpiece and trivia-inducing statuette for your home? Details: The Vincent Price statue is limited to 1,500 “numbered” units, depicting the legendary star in a classic pose with a skeleton. It’s made of space-age poly-resin, and sculpted with terrifying precision. Cost is $29.95 plus S&H. It’s expected to sell-out and likely out-of- print quickly. Available at: www.aggronautix.com and in independent record stores, comic shops, tattoo parlors, etc. Distributed by: www.mvdb2b.com Pre-order now at www.vincentpricefigure.com

For nearly 17 years Bob Putignano has been pivotal at WFDU with his Sounds of Blue radio show (Wed. & Fri. 9am-1pm) www.SoundsofBlue.comhttp://wfdu.fm Previously a contributing editor at Blues Revue, Blueswax, and Goldmine magazines, currently the Music Editor for the Yonkers Tribune & www.MakingAScene.org Bob was also the 2003 recipient of the “Keeping the Blues Alive” award (given by the Blues Foundation in Memphis) for his achievements in radio broadcasting. Putignano can be contacted at: BobP@SoundsofBlue.com

eHeziRue Morgue Magazine Partners and Vincent Price Estate Partner with Limited Edition Collectible Bobble-head Figures By BOB PUTIGNANO

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