Kashoggi In Context
By By LARRY M. ELKIN, CPA, CFP®

eHezi Governance, History, International, Law, People, Politics Leave a Comment

President Donald Trump speaks with Mohammed bin Salman, Deputy Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, during their meeting Tuesday, March 14, 2017, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)…

Larry Elkin, Certified Financial Planner (CFP®), CPA, is president of Palisades Hudson Financial Group.

FT. LAUDERDALE, FL — October 25, 2018 — Someone in Saudi Arabia – and most of the available information points to the crown prince, who is the country’s real power center – dispatched a hit squad to murder a dissident commentator inside the country’s consulate in Istanbul.

This much is clear. The question now is: What to do about it? The answer depends on whether we want to satisfy our emotions or our self-interest.

The death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi has occupied headlines for weeks, and there is no indication that this will change soon. This week, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan delivered a speech calling for the 18 men arrested in connection with Khashoggi’s death to be tried in Istanbul and harshly criticizing the credibility of the Saudi version of events. While many observers noted that the speech fell short of the “naked truth” Erdogan had previously promised to deliver – especially in light of reports that Turkey has audio and video evidence of the killing – it still cast a harsh shadow on Saudi Arabia, especially Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Khashoggi’s death was terrible. Saudi Arabia’s response was to falsely claim he had left the consulate under his own power the day of his disappearance. It took more than two weeks for officials to acknowledge that Khashoggi was dead at all. When they finally did, the Saudi line became that he had died accidentally as the result of a spontaneous fistfight, during which someone placed the journalist in a fatal chokehold. In the face of the evidence, the story stretches credulity well past the breaking point.

Now, international leaders must decide how to respond to this event, not only in isolation, but within the wider context of the region as a whole.

Someone in Saudi Arabia – and most of the available information points to the crown prince, who is the country’s real power center – dispatched a hit squad to murder a dissident commentator inside the country’s consulate in Istanbul.

This much is clear. The question now is: What to do about it? The answer depends on whether we want to satisfy our emotions or our self-interest.

The death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi has occupied headlines for weeks, and there is no indication that this will change soon. This week, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan delivered a speech calling for the 18 men arrested in connection with Khashoggi’s death to be tried in Istanbul and harshly criticizing the credibility of the Saudi version of events. While many observers noted that the speech fell short of the “naked truth” Erdogan had previously promised to deliver – especially in light of reports that Turkey has audio and video evidence of the killing – it still cast a harsh shadow on Saudi Arabia, especially Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Khashoggi’s death was terrible. Saudi Arabia’s response was to falsely claim he had left the consulate under his own power the day of his disappearance. It took more than two weeks for officials to acknowledge that Khashoggi was dead at all. When they finally did, the Saudi line became that he had died accidentally as the result of a spontaneous fistfight, during which someone placed the journalist in a fatal chokehold. In the face of the evidence, the story stretches credulity well past the breaking point.

Now, international leaders must decide how to respond to this event, not only in isolation, but within the wider context of the region as a whole.

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The views expressed in our blog posts are solely those of the post’s author.

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Larry Elkin, Certified Financial Planner (CFP®), CPA, is president of Palisades Hudson Financial Group. Palisades Hudson is a fee-only financial planning firm and investment manager based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with more than $1.4 billion under management. Branch offices are in Stamford, Connecticut; Atlanta, Georgia; Portland, Oregon; and Austin, Texas. It offers financial planning, wealth management, and tax services. Its Entertainment and Sports Team serves entertainers and professional athletes.

The firm’s monthly newsletter covering financial planning, taxes and investing is online at www.palisadeshudson.com/insights/sentinel. Social media: Twitter; LinkedIn; Facebook; Instagram.

 

 

eHeziKashoggi In Context
By By LARRY M. ELKIN, CPA, CFP®

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