7th Pedestrian Accident in Greenburgh; Town to Push for Red Light Cameras to Enhance Safety
By Greenburgh Town Supervisor PAUL FEINER

Paul Feiner Community, Education, Emergency Services, Governance, Greenburgh, NY, History, Law, New York State, People, Political Analysis, Technology, Westchester County, NY 2 Comments

The Feiner Report

Why Should Towns Be Treated Any Differently Than Cities When It Comes to Pedestrian / Motorist Safety?

Greenburgh Need to Be Authorized to Have Red Safety Cameras with Funding to Ve Used to Enhance Safety

7th Pedestrian Accident in Recent Months Today 

Greenburgh Town Supervisor Paul Feiner

GREENBURGH, NY — January 24, 2020 — There was another pedestrian accident in Greenburgh today; the 7th in recent months.  Today, a 14-year-old was struck by a motor vehicle mid-block between the Campus Place and Central Ave/Underhill Road/Old Army Road intersection. The 14-year-old sustained injuries, was transported to Westchester Medical Center and is reported to be in stable condition. The early investigation revealed that he was struck by a vehicle traveling southbound in the left lane of traffic as he crossed eastbound.  This accident, like some of the other recent pedestrian accidents, was not caused by the lack of sidewalks.

Since the accident I have received a number of calls asking the town to expedite the construction of sidewalks in and around the town. Although we built or secured funding for about six miles of new sidewalks in recent years, there are many other streets in Greenburgh that need sidewalks. And we don’t have enough funds to build all of them at once, although we are trying hard to prioritize the sidewalks that are most needed and to build some new sidewalks annually.   We have also enhanced some crosswalks around the town and the police are involved in education initiatives – encouraging pedestrians not to jaywalk and to use crosswalks, to wear reflectors and for motorists not to text while driving.  Thousands of free reflectors have been distributed.

An initiative that I think could help expedite safety and expedite safety implementation is for New York State to allow Red Light cameras in Greenburgh with all revenue directed to sidewalks safety initiatives.   

New York State has authorized red light cameras in cities but not in towns or villages. White Plains recently received $2.4 million in red light camera related tickets. 35,494 violations were issued. I believe that NYS should authorize the Town of Greenburgh to also place red light cameras and issue tickets to those who violate the law. I will ask the legislature to mandate that all the funds we receive be dedicated to sidewalks, crosswalk enhancement for pedestrian and motorist education.   Unlike other communities that have received funds for red light cameras, I am proposing that every penny we receive could only be used for safety purposes.  At the minimum the cameras and signage on the roads would act as a deterrent which will make our roads safer. The goal is not to just trap drivers but to slow down the speeds driven.

If White Plains is able to have speed cameras why shouldn’t Greenburgh? Central Ave, 9A, Saw Mill River Road have significant traffic. Why should the NY State Legislature treat safety differently in different communities? If we receive more funds for safety initiatives we could step up the construction of sidewalks in neighborhoods that have been asking for them instead of building only a few new sidewalks a year.  We could make a big difference sooner, rather than later.

Red light cameras: How many violations White Plains issued …

https://www.lohud.com/…/2020/01/14/red-light-camera-violations-white-plains/4455706002

LoHud reported 10 days ago that Red Light Cameras in White Plains raked in $2.4 million from 35,494 violation notices. The cameras operate 24 hours per day, capturing images of drivers who run through red lights in the City of White Plains.

Red-Light Cameras In White Plains Yield 35K Violations …

https://www.newyorktrafficattorneys.net/red-light-camera-ticket

Mar 23, 2018 · Red Light Traffic Safety Cameras (RLC) have been around a lot longer than you may think. RLC have been around for more than 20 years in New York. These tickets are treated similar to a parking ticket in that the ticket is written to the owner of the car and not the driver.

 

Paul Feiner7th Pedestrian Accident in Greenburgh; Town to Push for Red Light Cameras to Enhance Safety
By Greenburgh Town Supervisor PAUL FEINER

Comments 2

  1. Hmm, they want money, be honest. Pull up the National Motorists Association.

    Speed limits should be set to the 85th percentile free-flowing traffic speed, yellow lights made longer, and stop signs only used where needed. At intersections, time the yellow light to actual approach speeds and use realistic perception and reaction times. Right now in the US, we have poor traffic engineering, coupled with predatory enforcement.

    With red-light cameras, we should immediately discontinue their usage. In many areas, when the light is too short, people are cited a split-second after it changes, for stopping over the stop line, or a non-complete stop for a right-on-red turn. Who can defend this setup? The short yellows alone are a major problem, which yield most of the “violations.” Federal data also shows that non-complete stops for right turns almost never cause a crash, yet are the bulk of the tickets.

    All you need are speed limits set to the 85th percentile free-flowing traffic speed, longer yellows, decent length all-red intervals, and sensors to keep an all-red if someone enters late. No crashes! Can also sync lights and use sensors to change them and know where cars are.

  2. I 100% agree , I don’t live in Greenberg’s but I’m there very often; my daughter and grandchildren live there . But even if they didn’t I still agree it will definitely make these drivers more aware and safer for the people . I truly hope you get it .

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