Julius Caesar, General, Emperor of the Roman Empire: 100 B.C. to 45 B.C.
By WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, JOHN BAILEY, and HEZI ARIS

eHezi Archives, Book Reviews, Budget, Campaign Trail, Community, Education, Governance, History 5 Comments

The Ides of March – March 15, 45 B.C / March 15, 2021 Hezitorial

Julius Caesar, General, Emperot of the Roman Empire: 100 B.C. to 45 B.C.

New York State Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo. Archival photo.

ROME, ITALY, WHITE PLAINS, NY, and YONKERS, NY  — The character of our State Senators, Assemblymembers, Congressmembers, and Senators are revealing who and what they are as discerned in ways they are oblivious to and unaware.

The positions our leaders or would-be leaders of New York State are being swallowed in the wake of the unsubstantiated, not formally charged allegations against Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. Scenarios and circumstances  painfully familiar to those  cognizant of the greatest playwright of all time in the English language; one William Shakespeare. His voice may hearken to the past yet it describes the drama we are immersed in today as portrayed in two plays about power as written by the Bard himself.

Our guest columnist is the Bard: William Shakespeare wrote two plays, pertinent to this telling. One is Julius Caesar, the other Othello, each portraying the demise of two powerful men; leaders who were destroyed by persons they once ruled and revered by the jealousy of their one-time colleagues too timid to rule but jealous of their leader’s ability to rule because they sought the adulation that is bequeathed strictly by those who have attained power. 

Setting the scene. Julius Caesar was a military leader who conquered what we recognize today is known as the Roman Empire. Romans revered him and he became emperor.

This angered the Roman Senate and resulted in a power backlash ending in Caesar’s assassination by his friend, Brutus, on the floor of the Roman Senate on March 15, 45 B.C., 2065 years ago this coming Monday. Shakespeare wrote his play about the event before 1599 A.D. It is timely and worthy to be read.

Brutus was used by the conspiring Roman Senate. Brutus was Caesar’s friend, and yet he was persuaded to kill Caesar because the Senate told Brutus that Caesar was too ambitious. Brutus was convinced that assassinating Caesar was for the good of Rome. How familiar? The headline of this article is most appropriate:

“Beware the ides of March,” is a prophecy a soothsayer informed Caesar just about now before the day Caesar was stabbed and killed. Ides for those unfamiliar with latin stands for 15.

“Et tu, Brute?” was Shakespeare’s quote of Julius Caesar, after Brutus stabbed him. Let’s go to the power play by play of all time: Julius Caesar and the words of  our guest author/commentator of this very difficult to see play from the past whose words describe the ambitions and arguments we hear today. The play is very difficult to read or see, as is Othello; It is obvious our “lawmakers” are unfamiliar with either play, or perhaps read the lessons all too well.)

Mark Antony: At Caesar’s funeral:

“Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him;

The evil that men do lives after them,

The good is oft interred with their bones,

(For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all;

Honourable men)

Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral…

He was my friend, faithful and just to me:

But Brutus says he was ambitious;

And Brutus is an honourable man…

He hath brought many captives home to Rome,

Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:

Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?

When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:

Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:

Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;

And Brutus is an honourable man.

You all did see that on the Lupercal

I thrice presented him a kingly crown,

Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?

Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;

And, sure, he is an honourable man.

I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,

But here I am to speak what I do know.

You all did love him once, not without cause:

What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?

O judgement! Thou art fled to brutish beasts,

And men have lost their reason…Bear with me;

My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,

And I must pause till it come back to me.”

Random truisms’ in Julius Caesar:

“In the end, it is impossible to become what others believe you are.”

“The greatest enemy will hide in the last place you would ever look.”

“As a rule, what is out of sight disturbs men’s minds more seriously than what they see.”

“Men in general are quick to believe that which they wish to be true.”

“All bad precedents begin as justifiable measures.”

“I love the name of honor, more than I fear death.”

“What we wish, we readily believe, and what we ourselves think, we imagine others think so.”

It seems only just that allegations against the conduct of New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo be first investigated to the full extent of the law..Those whose outcry against New York’s Ceasar are quick to demand his stepping down. Yet he has stated, “That which I have been accused, I did not do!” Will he be proven right or will he be judged too ambitious for all the Brutuses who await his funeral so they may alight to the prominence of New York State Governor.

Julius Caesar, General, Emperor of the Roman Empire: 100 B.C. to 45 B.C. <br> By William Shakespeare

The Ides of March – March 15, 45 B.C / March 15, 2021

NOTE: White Plains CitizeNet Reporter Publisher/Editor John Bailey and Yonkers Tribune Publisher/Editor

The character of our State Senators, Assemblymembers, Congress members, and Senators are revealing who and what they are as the are discern ways they are unaware.

The positions our leaders or would-be leaders of New York State are being swallowed in the wake of the unsubstantiated, not formally charged allegations against Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, are painfully familiar to those familiar to those cognizant of the greatest playwright of the English language of all time; one William Shakespeare. His voice may hearken to the past yet it describes exactly what we are engulfed in today as portrayed in two plays about power.

Our guest columnist is the bard: William Shakespeare wrote two plays, pertinent to this telling. One is Julius Caesar, the other Othello, each portraying the demise of two powerful men; leaders who were destroyed by persons they once ruled and revered by the jealousy of their one-time colleagues too timid to rule but jealous of their leader’s ability to rule because they sought the adulation that is bequeathed strictly by those who have attained power. 

Setting the scene. Julius Caesar was a military leader who conquered what we recognize today is known as the Roman Empire. Romans revered him and he became emperor.

This angered the Roman Senate and resulted in a power backlash ending in Caesar’s assassination by his friend, Brutus, on the floor of the Roman Senate on March 15, 45 B.C., 2065 years ago this coming Monday. Shakespeare wrote his play about the event before 1599 A.D. It is timely and worthy to be read.

Brutus was used by the conspiring Roman Senate. Brutus was Caesar’s friend, and yet he was persuaded to kill Caesar because the Senate told Brutus that Caesar was too ambitious. Brutus was convinced that assassinating Caesar was for the good of Rome. How familiar? The headline of this article is most appropriate:

“Beware the ides of March,” is a prophecy a soothsayer informed Caesar just about now before the day Caesar was stabbed and killed. Ides for those unfamiliar with latin stands for 15.

“Et tu, Brute?” (You too Brutus?”) was Shakespeare’s quote of Julius Caesar, after Brutus stabbed him. Let’s go to the power play by play of all time: Julius Caesar and the words of  our guest author / commentator of this very difficult to see play from the past whose words describe the ambitions and arguments we hear today. The play is very difficult to read or see, as is Othello; It is obvious our “lawmakers” are unfamiliar with either play, or perhaps read the lessons all too well.)

Mark Antony: At Caesar’s funeral:

“Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him;

The evil that men do lives after them,

The good is oft interred with their bones,

(For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all;

Honourable men)

Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral…

He was my friend, faithful and just to me:

But Brutus says he was ambitious;

And Brutus is an honourable man…

He hath brought many captives home to Rome,

Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:

Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?

When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:

Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:

Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;

And Brutus is an honourable man.

You all did see that on the Lupercal

I thrice presented him a kingly crown,

Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?

Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;

And, sure, he is an honourable man.

I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,

But here I am to speak what I do know.

You all did love him once, not without cause:

What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?

O judgement! Thou art fled to brutish beasts,

And men have lost their reason…Bear with me;

My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,

And I must pause till it come back to me.”

Random truisms’ in Julius Caesar:

“In the end, it is impossible to become what others believe you are.”

“The greatest enemy will hide in the last place you would ever look.”

“As a rule, what is out of sight disturbs men’s minds more seriously than what they see.”

“Men in general are quick to believe that which they wish to be true.”

“All bad precedents begin as justifiable measures.”

“I love the name of honor, more than I fear death.”

“What we wish, we readily believe, and what we ourselves think, we imagine others think so.”

It seems only just that allegations against the conduct of New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo be first investigated to the full extent o the law..Those whose outcry gains New York’s Ceasar are quick to demand his stepping down. Yet he has stated, “That which I have been accused, I did not do!” Will he be proven right or will he be judged too ambitious for all the Brutuses who await his funeral so they may alight to the prominence of New York State Governor.

Some suggest Après moi, le déluge” (‘After me, the flood’) is a French expression attributed to King Louis XV of France or in the form “Après nous, le déluge” (‘After us, the flood’) to Madame de Pompadour. It is generally regarded as a nihilistic expression of indifference to whatever happens after one is gone, though it may also express a more literal forecasting of ruination. Its meaning is translated by Brewer in the forms “When I am dead the deluge may come for aught I care”, and “Ruin, if you like, when we are dead and gone.”

The phrase itself is in reference to the biblical floods.

The phrase is also often seen as foretelling the French Revolution and the corresponding ruin brought to aristocratic decadence.

Karl Marx (Das Kapital) and Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky apply the phrase in their writings to describe the selfishness and apathy of certain corrupting values.

The writings of the 1920s, by D.H.Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) also uses the expression “Après moi, le déluge!” several times. I believe his definition is most analogous with regard to Governor Cuomo. D.H. Lawrence defined the phrase “the tacit utterance of every man”, in his “crisis” of unbearable “loneliness … surrounded by nullity”. But “you mustn’t expect it to wait for your convenience,” he warns the dissolute “younger generation”; “the real deluge lies just ahead of us”.

The White Plains CitizeNetReporter Publisher/Editor John Bailey,and Yonkers Tribune Publisher/Editor Hezi Aris support the governor, despite the self-serving “wannabes”  who delight in the prospect of Governor Cuomo’s demise. It behooves the governing New York State Legislature, both Senate and Assembly to await assertions be proven his demise  will prove “Apres moi, Le deluge.”

eHeziJulius Caesar, General, Emperor of the Roman Empire: 100 B.C. to 45 B.C.
By WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, JOHN BAILEY, and HEZI ARIS

Comments 5

  1. A powerful piece. Well written, that it gives pause to the current set of circumstances.
    Enters Swartz (stage left) and now I’d need to read Act 1, Scene 2. Hopefully in that scene, he acted on his own volition and had no intention real or implied to involve vaccine distribution into ‘play.’
    A good🧐 read.

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